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Natto


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#31 tissue

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Posted 27 February 2003 - 04:04 PM

Tissue, the chopped up ones are usually for natto maki, the natto and rice rolled in seaweed snack eaten out of hand.

You should see the variety they have in Japan, some come withnan umeboshi sauce instead of the regular tsuyu another one has something like 5 different grains added as well.Then there are the bean differences, anywhere from little tiny brown ones to jumbo black ones.

Another question, so if they are made as natto maki. Then do you put it into rice balls too?

I totally love the rice balls. When I go to the convenience stores in Japan I always buy some salmon ones. They are so clever with the wrapping, keeping it separated from the rice.

Thinking about going to buy some more natto and grossing out my coworkers again.

#32 Wimpy

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Posted 27 February 2003 - 04:11 PM

Torakris-

That's the way my Edo-ko (Tokyo-born) Mom taught me.

Tissue- one whole chicken egg may be a bit too much for first timers- I mean it's pretty slimey already without. A classier version is to use one raw quail's egg and plop in the middle of the natto. Make sure egg is fresh!

Oh and by the way, best thing to drink with it is green tea or other hot teas to clear the palate of the slimey feel. Cold water won't do it.

#33 torakris

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Posted 27 February 2003 - 04:15 PM

I have never actually seen natto in onigiri (rice balls) when it is sold in the convenience stores it is sold in one of two forms. Either the te-maki zushi style which looks like an ice cream cone, or in the kappa-maki (cucumber roll) style, usually sold in about a 4 inch long roll.

The convenience store onigiri in Japan are really wonderful, a little while ago I had a king salmon onigri (grilled salmon was gently flaked) and was sooooo much better than the usual salmon flake. My two other current favorites are a maguro wasabi-joyu (raw tune with wasabi and soy sauce) and shio-kalbi (salt flavored kalbi style grilled beef).
Every convenience store here has their own specialities.

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#34 torakris

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Posted 27 February 2003 - 04:17 PM

Torakris-

That's the way my Edo-ko (Tokyo-born) Mom taught me. 

Wimpy,

I was instructed on the proper art of natto making by my Edo-ko husband! :biggrin:

Must be a Tokyo thing!

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#35 Wimpy

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Posted 27 February 2003 - 06:35 PM

Torakris-

My mom and I used to corner the natto supply at home all the time coz my younger brother and my gai-jin dad couldn't stand it! Lucky for us!

Luckily, we have plenty of natto supply here in Singapore where I am now based. There's a huge Japanese expat community here so they have large supermarkets (e.g. Isetan and Takashimaya) filled to the brim with japanese products, including potatoes from hokkaido, and the like, and yes, natto.

Sad part is that my gai-jin wife disallows natto at the table when she is present, so I must skulk in the corners of the home at odd hours to enjoy my little treat.

:sad:

#36 Akiko

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Posted 28 February 2003 - 02:52 AM

:smile:
My husband banned it from our home... so I'd always order it at restaurants.. and then I got him to have a bite here and there. He still does not especially like it... but I think I'm getting him there...

fried bacon bits in your natto is also good. I'm being quite serious.

But then fried bacon bits are good in a lot of things!

#37 Akiko

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Posted 28 February 2003 - 03:00 AM

Tissue,

try the chopped up version on your bowl of rice. There's a different texture to the different sizes of natto and whether they are chopped or whole. It affects the taste too, some of those big bean natto versions make me cringe... I'm not sure if its the size or the fact that I think it becomes a little too... beany.

I like the chopped and the koh-tsubu (small beans).

But you should try them All!

#38 margaret

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Posted 28 February 2003 - 08:17 AM

Any opinions on the natto with other ingredients pre-added? I recently tried a few different varieties - one with hijiki (eh), one with kombu (not bad), one with a five grain mixture added - but I think I still prefer the tried-and-true plain, tare/karashi garden variety. Any other interesting flavors out there?

My favorite way of eating it has always been to pour it over hiya yakko (chilled plain tofu) with scallions and lots of soy sauce. Tastes good, and there's something interesting about eating the soybean in three different forms in one dish that's always appealed to me. Chopped okra is also a good addition, too.

#39 Jinmyo

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Posted 28 February 2003 - 08:23 AM

Margaret, welcome to eGullet.

Yes, I think the hiyayako with shoyu and natto thing is fun also. Sometimes I'll make a miso/mirin sauce instead of shoyu.
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#40 torakris

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Posted 28 February 2003 - 05:43 PM

Any opinions on the natto with other ingredients pre-added? I recently tried a few different varieties - one with hijiki (eh), one with kombu (not bad), one with a five grain mixture added - but I think I still prefer the tried-and-true plain, tare/karashi garden variety. Any other interesting flavors out there?

My favorite way of eating it has always been to pour it over hiya yakko (chilled plain tofu) with scallions and lots of soy sauce. Tastes good, and there's something interesting about eating the soybean in three different forms in one dish that's always appealed to me. Chopped okra is also a good addition, too.

Margret,
like you I at one time tried all the different varieties and always came back up the plain old karashi/soy ones.
I have a hard time with the large beans, a koh-tsubu girl myself!

my husband's favorite way of eating it is with chilled noodles topped with natto, the little balls leftover from tempura making, scallions, and okra.

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#41 tissue

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Posted 04 March 2003 - 10:26 AM

my husband's favorite way of eating it is with chilled noodles topped with natto, the little balls leftover from tempura making, scallions, and okra.

Do you eat it with somen or soba?
And do you cook the okra before you add it to the noodle?

#42 torakris

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Posted 04 March 2003 - 03:21 PM

He eats it with either somen, udon, or soba, depending on what is in the house and in that preference.
We eat the okra raw, but everyone seems to think that is weird! :shock: :sad: :biggrin:

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#43 torakris

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Posted 19 April 2003 - 09:37 PM

My husband's newest way of eating natto is to mix it into gyudon with a whole raw egg, he say it on tv a week or so ago and as been eating it for breakfast everyday since.I guess I can't really comment until I have tried it....

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#44 smallworld

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Posted 19 April 2003 - 10:02 PM

I can't imagine natto gyudon. So are you saying that you make gyudon for breakfast every morning??
Your husband's other favourite, with noodles, sounds like a soba dish I've been eating lots lately.

Someone mentioned natto and kimchi earlier- I love it. Sounds gross but they go well together. It's best to chop the kimchi into small bits first, and it's good served with little sheets of nori- you can scoop the natto kimchi up in the nori like a little taco.

Since natto is supposed to be good for lowering cholesterol (and soy products are super-healthy anyway), I'm trying to serve in several times a week, if not everyday. Natto kimchi works well as a snack or appetizer, which is good for days when we get a bit sick of regular natto.

The first time I had natto that I liked was deep-fried natto at an izakaya, but I took that merely as proof that ANYTHING tastes good deep-fried. Next was natto on pizza (I can practicly hear all the 'Eeeeew's out there!) which let me appreciate the nutty flavour of natto. The stinky cheese flavour/aroma matched the real cheese pretty nicely, and the strings either disappeared from the heat of fused to the cheese's strings. Very nice, and the next time I had plain raw natto I liked it!
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#45 torakris

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Posted 20 April 2003 - 04:00 AM

I can't imagine natto gyudon. So are you saying that you make gyudon for breakfast every morning??

He works close to a Yoshinoya gyudon shop! :biggrin:

I normally just make onigiri for his breakfast and he eats it at work, but occasionally he will go out instead.

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#46 tissue

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Posted 22 April 2003 - 09:09 AM

Any opinions on the natto with other ingredients pre-added? I recently tried a few different varieties - one with hijiki (eh), one with kombu (not bad), one with a five grain mixture added - but I think I still prefer the tried-and-true plain, tare/karashi garden variety. Any other interesting flavors out there?

Last week I bought some natto and it came with this green sauce in the packet. It was shisho sauce. Looked a little like fine pesto, as a matter of fact. But the shiso flavor was very nice, very strong counter to the natto.

#47 Suzanne F

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Posted 22 April 2003 - 11:20 AM

Tissue, that sounds like a way I'd be willing to try natto again. I LOVE shiso! Guess I'll have to ask the store clerks for help, though, since Japanese is one language I can't figure out. :sad:

#48 tissue

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Posted 22 April 2003 - 11:37 AM

Suzanne,
yeah you should ask someone to help you. I actually didn't know what I was buying. The package was green though, since normally the other natto packages are white or tan or pink.

#49 torakris

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Posted 22 April 2003 - 03:25 PM

Any opinions on the natto with other ingredients pre-added? I recently tried a few different varieties - one with hijiki (eh), one with kombu (not bad), one with a five grain mixture added - but I think I still prefer the tried-and-true plain, tare/karashi garden variety. Any other interesting flavors out there?

Last week I bought some natto and it came with this green sauce in the packet. It was shisho sauce. Looked a little like fine pesto, as a matter of fact. But the shiso flavor was very nice, very strong counter to the natto.

I had this a little while ago too, I was quite surprised at how good it was.
I just bout a new kimchi cookbook the other day and it has a recipe for making natto kimchi, not mixing the 2 together but actually kimchi-ing natto!

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#50 torakris

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Posted 28 April 2003 - 03:36 PM

My 2 year old ahs been on a natto kick this week and it is the only thing I can get him to eat! He wants just natto no rice and i have to add the little pack of karashi (hot mustard) or he throws a fit!!
Today my husband made up his own natto for breakfast with sakura ebi (dried shrimp), nori, hijiki, scallions and egg.

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#51 tissue

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Posted 29 April 2003 - 10:09 AM

Last week, I read on the news that Japanese scientists discovered a new vitamin that was somehow affiliated with the nutrients in natto. Anyone else read/heard about this?
I don't know if it is nattokinese or not...

Edited by tissue, 29 April 2003 - 10:10 AM.


#52 margaret

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Posted 29 April 2003 - 10:22 AM

This is a link to an article about the new vitamin PQQ. Apparently natto is the best source, but it's also in parsley, green tea, green peppers, and kiwi.

One more reason to eat natto! Not like I needed any more.

#53 torakris

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Posted 29 April 2003 - 02:14 PM

Last week, I read on the news that Japanese scientists discovered a new vitamin that was somehow affiliated with the nutrients in natto. Anyone else read/heard about this?
I don't know if it is nattokinese or not...

Yeah my FIL was just telling us about it this weekend.
Natto the new wonder food!

I doubt it will catch on in too many places though :laugh:

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#54 tissue

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Posted 12 May 2003 - 01:26 PM

I tried natto with barley in it today.

It tasted milder but the texture was extra sticky/gloppy.

Anyone else tried it?

Edited by tissue, 12 May 2003 - 01:26 PM.


#55 torakris

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Posted 12 May 2003 - 02:18 PM

I tried natto with barley in it today.

It tasted milder but the texture was extra sticky/gloppy.

Anyone else tried it?

The natto with barley is pretty good, they have another one her that has something like 7 different grains added (it could be 4) that I used to enjoy 2 years ago or so.

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#56 Jinmyo

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Posted 19 June 2003 - 03:49 AM

The following is a write-up by a friend of mine who has given me permission to post it here:

An unusual but delicious Japanese soyfood is natto, fermented soybeans. If you have rice-straw lying about your apartment, you could make it the traditional way. If not, you can use a bit of some purchased natto as a starter.

Ingredients:


two cups dried soybeans
water
one package commercial natto
What to do:
1. Soak two cups of dried soybeans overnight in ten cups of water.
2. Put the soybeans in a stainless steel basket (or colander) and cover it with a piece of cloth slightly larger than the basket.
3. Put the above in a pressure cooker with 3 cups water, and place it on the stove. Turn on the stove.
4. After the pressure cooker starts hissing, turn down the flame so that the hissing is at its minimum level.
5. Cook for 15 minutes (measured from the time that hissing noise started).
6. DO NOT OPEN the pressure cooker yet. Allow the pressure cooker and its contents to cool down. Or at least place the pressure cooker in the sink filled with cold water. (The soy beans are considered to have cooled down as long as its temperature is below 140 degrees F.)
7. Make sure that the kitchen counter and its surrounding area are absolutely clean. Sterilize a tablespoon with boiling water.
8. Wash your hands and arms - long-sleeved shirts not recommended.
9. Have a package of commercial natto ready.
10. Open the lid of the pressure cooker, peel back the cloth cover to one end of the basket, and using the tablespoon, quickly mix in about two spoonfuls of natto starter with the beans. Replace the cloth cover.
11. Close the pressure cooker lid with its air relief hole uncovered.
12. Place the cooker in a picnic ice-chest and place an electric heating pad over it. Replace the ice-chest cover.

The natto will be ready in between 24 and 48 hours, depending on the temperature of the heating pad. As an alternate heat source, a 7.5-watt lightbulb may be used. If you don't have a pressure cooker, a regular pot may be used. In this case, the cooking time will need to be increased to about two hours, and the amount of cooking water to about six cups.
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#57 torakris

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Posted 19 June 2003 - 04:33 AM

I was told that it used to be quite popular to "ferment" the natto under the kotatsu.
a kotatsu is a low table that has a heating element either inside or underneath and is covered with a kind of quilt, it is used through out the winter to keep warm by placing the lower half of your body under the quilt.

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#58 torakris

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Posted 19 June 2003 - 04:41 AM

more on natto and the kotatsu:

http://www.pref.ibar...aki/eibara6.htm

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#59 Katherine

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Posted 19 June 2003 - 05:50 AM

For people who don't have nattoo available locally, nattoo starter and kits.

#60 gus_tatory

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Posted 19 June 2003 - 10:36 AM

thanks Jinmyo--

this process is very interesting to me, and i make home-made yogurt, so feel i could succeed with natto.

as a matter of fact, i'm thinking my yogurt maker (small, 6-cup size)would be perfect for "incubating" the natto, since i have no kotatsu.
:smile:
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