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Things to do with frozen peas


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#1 Fat Guy

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 10:33 AM

I thought we were out of frozen peas, so I bought two bags today. When I went to put them in the freezer, I found two full bags and a mostly full third bag. So, with nearly five bags of peas, I really need to cook some peas.

Of course, I can figure out to eat them just heated up and served as peas. I also occasionally snack on them right out of the bag, like little green frozen M&Ms. But let's say I want more from the relationship?

I'm trying to think outside the box, bag, whatever here. I know a few pasta and rice dishes to which peas can be added. What I'm really trying to figure out is something unexpected.

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#2 Luckylies

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 10:48 AM

peas with mint and bacon.

pea pot pies.

pea filling for ravioli (with some ricotta in the puree)
does this come in pork?

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#3 Jean Blanchard

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 10:57 AM

Pea Soup - a little mint lemon, etc. Very "spring" tasting.

#4 Rehovot

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 10:57 AM

Samosas! :smile:

#5 heidih

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 11:02 AM

Creamed peas using any recipe you like for creamed spinach with plenty of fresh dill snipped over before serving. Served with crusty garlic bread this was childhood comfort food in our family.

#6 amccomb

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 11:10 AM

A pea salad, similar to a potato salad, with red onions, a sour cream and/or mayo base with some fresh dill and maybe some bacon.

Edited by amccomb, 29 April 2007 - 01:39 PM.


#7 dockhl

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 11:17 AM

Indian Cheese with Peas (Mattar Pannir)

For the pannir:
2 quarts (2 L) milk
1/2 cup (125 ml) plain yogurt
2 Tbs (30 ml) fresh lemon juice

For the peas:
1/4 cup (60 ml) ghee
2 Tbs (30 ml) finely chopped fresh ginger
2-3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 cup (250 ml) reserved whey from the pannir
1 Tbs (15 ml) garam masala
1 tsp (5 ml) ground coriander
1 tsp (5 ml) turmeric
1/4 tsp (1 ml) cayenne pepper, or to taste
2-3 tomatoes, finely chopped
1 1/2 cups (375 ml) fresh or frozen peas, thawed
1 tsp (5 ml) sugar
Chopped cilantro (coriander leaves) for garnish

To make the pannir, bring the milk to a boil in a saucepan over moderate
heat. Remove from the heat and stir in the yogurt and lemon juice - the
curds should form almost immediately. Pour the contents of the pot into
a sieve lined with several layers of cheesecloth (muslin) set over a large
bowl. Let drain until cool enough to handle, then wrap the cheesecloth
around the curds and wring to extract as much whey as possible. Reserve
1 cup of the whey for the recipe and discard the rest. Place the cheese,
still wrapped in the cheesecloth, on a baking sheet and place a heavy
skillet and several heavy cans or heavy pots on top (total weight should
be about 15 lbs, 6 Kg) and let rest at room temperature for 6 to 8 hours,
until the cheese is firm. Remove the cheesecloth and cut the cheese into
1/2-inch (1 cm) cubes.

Heat the ghee in a heavy skillet over moderate heat until very hot and
fry the cheese cubes in batches until golden brown on all sides. Transfer
the browned cheese cubes to a plate. Add the ginger and garlic to the
ghee remaining in the skillet and saute for 30 seconds. Add the onions
and saute, stirring frequently, until the onions are golden brown, about
10 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients and bring to a boil, stirring
occasionally. Reduce the heat to low and simmer partially covered for
10 minutes. Add the cheese cubes and simmer covered for 10 minutes.
Garnish with chopped cilantro. Serves 4 to 6.

#8 marlena spieler

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 11:20 AM

stew a lotta peas with chopped onion and lotsa coarsely chopped garlic that has been softened in extra virgin. Add tomatoes--canned for this time of year, ripe and robust when the season hits. SEason to taste with salt, pepper, and maybe some fennel or thyme...then poach an egg per person into the pea and tomato sauce which should be nice and thick. If it isn't, add some tomato paste.

eat it with rustic bread to scoop into the messy eggy-pea and tomato dish. this is one of my fave comfort dishes, brought home from a greek island.

there is, however, one secret ingredient: cigarette ashes, dropped into the delicious brew by the village cook who taught me, smoking as she cooked and stirred.
Marlena the spieler



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#9 dockhl

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 11:21 AM

Petit Pois

Peas cooked with lettuce leaves.

INGREDIENTS:

* lettuce leaves, rinsed and left moist
* 1 package (10 ounces) petite peas, partially thawed and broken up or about 1 1/2 to 2 cups shelled young peas
* 1 teaspoon sugar
* 1/2 teaspoon salt
* 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
* 2 tablespoons butter

PREPARATION:
Directions for petit pois
Line a heavy skillet or Dutch oven with 3 to 4 large lettuce leaves. Add peas; sprinkle with sugar, salt and pepper. Dot with butter over the top of peas. Top with another lettuce leaf or two. Cover tightly and cook over medium low heat for 8 to 10 minutes (a little longer for fresh peas), or until peas are tender. Check and add small amounts of water if the peas are drying out. Lettuce may be chopped and served with peas, if desired.

#10 SuzySushi

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 11:24 AM

Some great ideas here! Need to bookmark this thread. :biggrin:

Of course, though, the first thing I thought of when I read the thread title is that the packages make great icepacks. . . :hmmm:
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#11 Milagai

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 11:25 AM

Unless you really want to try making paneer,
get some from yr local Whole Foods, or Indian store,
or Trader Joe's...
Then make matar paneer as suggested.
No need to deep fry the paneer cubes, stick them
in a toaster oven to broil/grill instead. Turn them over
after a while so they get evenly golden.

Sundal is also a great and quick alternative
for frozen peas, cook them quickly (steaming is best)
with salt to taste
and do a tarka of (for 4 cups cooked peas):
1 tbsp cooking oil, 1/4 tsp hing, 1/2 tsp mustard seeds,
1-2 dry red chillies broken in half OR 1 hot green chili minced
with 1/4 inch chunk of ginger.
Dump over the peas and mix, garnish with
cilantro, a little shredded fresh coconut, splash of fresh lemon juice;
if you can find an unripe mango, peel and dice finely and add
to the mix.
Literally takes 5 minutes to cook, eat it warm or room temp,
great quick dish for picnics or any time you don't want to heat
up the kitchen with cooking.

Milagai

#12 project

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 12:14 PM

One of the best vegetable dishes I ever ate was peas done in some provincial French style at the Rive Gauche restaurant long at the SW corner of Wisconsin and M streets in DC.

Never have been able to recreate what they did, but from memory it had a lot of flavor and emphasized bacon, onion, and mushrooms. For all I know, maybe there was also white wine and stock.

In my efforts, I start with 'baby' peas.
What would be the right food and wine to go with
R. Strauss's 'Ein Heldenleben'?

#13 Kerry Beal

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 12:38 PM

Good to reduce swelling after cooking burns and for injuries.

#14 heidih

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 12:44 PM

Some great ideas here! Need to bookmark this thread.  :biggrin:

Of course, though, the first thing I thought of when I read the thread title is that the packages make great icepacks. . . :hmmm:

View Post


Oh yes- I thought the same. Especially if you have kids. We keep 2 bags with a duct tape labels on them that won't peel off just for those boo-boos that need ice.

#15 GTO

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 01:01 PM

How about some Pea Pesto?

Not something I've tried yet, but it's the first thing that came to mind.
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#16 Magictofu

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 01:28 PM

Make a puree and used them in various recipes:

- I have done very succesfull pea flans in the past... I can easily imagine pea souffle (with a nice cheese to complement the flavour) although I never tried.

- You can also make a sauce with peas and herbs... great with fish.

- Soups

- Pasta fillings (with a mint, lemon and thyme butter sauce... hummm :raz: )

- Baby food :wink:

#17 amccomb

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 01:38 PM

- I have done very succesfull pea flans in the past... I can easily imagine pea souffle (with a nice cheese to complement the flavour) although I never tried.

View Post


That reminds me - I just made a pea and mushroom quiche this past week. I love the little burst of sweetness from the peas.

#18 petite tête de chou

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 01:50 PM

I use about a cup of thawed peas in my fried rice.

The quiche idea is wonderful. A pea and fresh herb quiche is really, really good.

Sometimes I fold peas into my mashed potatoes and also use them as a baked potato topping (fried in butter with onions). The little bursts of *green* flavor marry so well with the fluffy potatoes.
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#19 ludja

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 01:54 PM

A pea salad, similar to a potato salad, with red onions, a sour cream and/or mayo base with some fresh dill and maybe some bacon.

View Post

This reminds me also of "Russian Salad" or Salade Russe which is also a popular Spanich tapas. Bascially it is a vegetable salad usually with potatoes, peas, green beans, maybe carrots. There are many versions but they usually have potatoes and peas. Sometimes meat like ham or tuna is added or eggs. I think the dressing is often creamy but I've also seen ones dressed in vinegar and oil in some of my Spanish cookbooks.

This doesn't look like a very exciting recipe to me but it gives an idea of the approach: click

The salad is also popular in Russia, I believe, but it's not called "Russian Salad" there.

A friend made a terrific potato salad once with peas. I think it was potatoes, peas, onions, (green onions?), fresh tarragon and a simple wine vinegar vinaigrette. I've always wanted to duplicate that dish.

I always use peas (and carrots) in the turkey pot pie I make after Thanksgiving, but one could also make some chicken or ham pot pies.

edited to add: I made a great pea side dish for Easter that I will make again; it's Pea and Fava Bean Ragout from Chez Panisse Vegetables.

I also added chopped asparagus to it that I had pre-blanched. You just stew the peas, peeled fava beans and (asparagus; if using) in a mixture of butter and olive oil over low heat. Add a few slivers of garlic to the mix as well. At the end, add a chiffonade of basil and/or mint and season with salt and pepper. Excellent and very easy!

She also suggests that you could thin this out with a small amount of chicken stock and use it as a pasta sauce. I think it would also be great over fresh split biscuits in a type of savory shortcake or over a pan fried risotto cake. I think it would also make a nice light lunch or meal served with some fresh cornbread.

Other vegetables that she suggests could be part of the mix: artichoke hearts, sugar snap peas, morels, tender green beans, spring onions, green garlic, proscuitto (thin slices) and slices of boiled new potatoes. I think all the variations would work very well. Pancetta would also be another nice add in.

Edited by ludja, 29 April 2007 - 02:07 PM.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

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#20 Sneakeater

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 02:03 PM

I had some surgery last year, and the surgeon told me that frozen peas in a plastic bad made an excellent cold compress.

#21 scubadoo97

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 03:38 PM

Make a puree and used them in various recipes:

View Post


I made a pea puree not long ago. Thawed peas in a blender with saueted shallots, a little cream and mint. S & P to taste. The color was awesome and it taste great. Would work well as a side to chicken, fish or beef.

#22 Tess

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 04:50 PM

Marjoram is another thing that tastes good with peas and really perks the frozen ones up. Mix it with your butter or whatever.

#23 BarbaraY

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 05:02 PM

A pea salad has already been mentioned but a pea salad with green onion and celery and an Oriental type dressing of soy sauce, rice vinegar, sesame oil, etc. is very good.

#24 heidih

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 05:23 PM

stew a lotta peas with chopped onion and lotsa coarsely chopped garlic that has been softened in extra virgin. Add tomatoes--canned for this time of year, ripe and robust when the season hits. SEason to taste with salt, pepper, and maybe some fennel or thyme...then poach an egg per person into the pea and tomato sauce which should be nice and thick. If it isn't, add some tomato paste.

eat it with rustic bread to scoop into the messy eggy-pea and tomato dish. this is one of my fave comfort dishes, brought home from a greek island.

there is, however, one secret ingredient: cigarette ashes, dropped into the delicious brew by the village cook who taught me, smoking as she cooked and stirred.

View Post


That does sound like comfort food- will definately try (w/o ciggie ash)

#25 purplewiz

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 05:39 PM

Cooked peas, butter, curry powder, feta cheese crumbles. Add some cooked cauliflower if you have some (or defrost/cook some). This dish has gone over like gangbusters at potlucks.

If you have some of Penzey's Ozark seasoning, it seems to be made to go with peas. Once again it's peas, butter, and Ozark seasoning to taste.

I'm also with the pea puree crowd. When I've served this people have looked at it like an exotic vegetable or something. Makes a nice bed/platform for grilled meats, too.

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#26 Fat Guy

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 07:00 PM

Some terrific ideas, folks. Please keep them coming.

Incidentally, I learned that peas, like any self-respecting food product, have their own trade organization. You can see the website at: http://www.peas.org/

There are a ton of recipe ideas on that website, including:

Spicy Pea and Avocado Dip
Garden Pea, Pecorino and Mint Soufflé
Pea and Goat's Cheese Tart
Warm Pea and Lentil Salad
Grilled Halloumi with Peas, Pine Nuts, Broad Beans and Rocket
Pea, Tuna and White Bean Salad with Lemon Dressing
Sauté of Peas and Lettuce
Pea and Roasted Garlic Soup
Cheesy Pea and Bacon Fritters
Japanese Miso-style Pea and Tofu Soup with Chives
Warm Pea, Broccoli, Chorizo and Feta Tart

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
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Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)


#27 amccomb

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 07:03 PM

Yum. Now I wish I had five bags of peas in my freezer. I can't decide what to try first!

#28 Fat Guy

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 07:08 PM

I'm not particularly proud of the creativity quotient in my household tonight, but I did manage to use about a third of a bag of peas. I made chicken with mushrooms and peas. Sauteed chicken, set aside. Sauteed mushrooms, set aside. Made a pan sauce from capers (packed in Sherry vinegar), chicken stock, a little soy sauce, a little sesame oil and a dash of oregano. Added the chicken and mushrooms, as well as frozen peas, to the sauce and heated through.

One point of interest: peas and capers have kind of a similar appearance in a finished, sauced dish. I may have to explore the peas-and-capers concept a bit more someday.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
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#29 annecros

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 07:56 PM

Some great ideas here! Need to bookmark this thread.  :biggrin:

Of course, though, the first thing I thought of when I read the thread title is that the packages make great icepacks. . . :hmmm:

View Post



OH! You are so right!

Any injury to the human body, be it sports related or accident related, a bag of frozen peas makes a wonderful, flexible, and cold ice pack. Remember the RICE acronym, Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Frozen peas will coddle an injury like nothing else.

Been there, had kids, done that.

#30 djyee100

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 09:14 PM

This is a comfort food for me: Ground Beef with Peas in an Asian stirfry. The recipe is from a 1960s cookbook I will not name, because the author is now in disrepute. She offers "Chinese-American" recipes like chop suey, seasoned with MSG--This cookbook was published before Chinese food was supposed to be healthy or authentic. :laugh: But I cook the recipes now and then. The food reminds me of the Chinese restaurant food I ate as a kid, and hey, it still tastes good. I skip the MSG, though.

Here is my adaptation. It's quick and easy after a busy day.

GROUND BEEF WITH PEAS

2 Tb oil
2 cloves garlic, crushed
few slices of fresh gingerroot
1 large onion, sliced
1 lb ground beef
2 Tb soy sauce
1 Tb dry sherry
1 tsp sugar
1 Tb cornstarch, dissolved in a little water
3 cups frozen peas (FG, this is almost a whole bag!)
roasted sesame oil

Heat the oil in a wok or large skillet over high heat. Add the garlic and gingerroot, then the onion, and saute until slightly softened. Crumble in the ground beef, and break it up into smaller chunks with a spatula. Cook the beef until the red color disappears. Add the soy sauce, sherry, sugar, and 1 cup of water. Mix in well. Add the peas, and let cook for a minute. Season with salt and pepper. Then add the dissolved cornstarch. Bring to a boil, adding more water as necessary, until the peas are hot and the gravy has thickened. Drizzle with a little roasted sesame oil. Serve hot over steamed rice.

Edited by djyee100, 30 April 2007 - 12:50 AM.