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Press Pot/French Press Coffee


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140 replies to this topic

#31 malachi

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Posted 05 August 2004 - 10:14 PM

Buy a smaller Press Pot.
Make more pots of coffee and drink it fresh.
Shrug.

Extraction will continue as long as the grounds are in contact with water.
Fresh coffee is generally considered to be less than 20 minutes old - though I, personally, wouldn't drink coffee that had sat, period.
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#32 winesonoma

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Posted 06 August 2004 - 10:15 AM

Campmor sells a number of presses that are unbreakable including a Nissan stainless. http://www.campmor.c...category_rn=239
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#33 phaelon56

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Posted 06 August 2004 - 11:56 AM

But doesn't the Columbia keep the grounds in contact with the coffee? No negative effect from that?


Yes there is. IMHO and based on perosnal experience, after 15 - 20 minutes in the thermal french press, the coffee starts to change because it's still absorbing bits of flavor components from the grounds in the bottom. I'm with Richard on this one - pour it off into a carafe.

My cheapie-works great-almost as good as french press alternative is a Melitta cone with one of those gold mesh reusable filters - it lests most of the flavor oils through the way that press pot coffee does. I brew directly into a cheap thermal carafe that happens to fit the base of the Melitta cone nicely. Makes great coffee and it's simple.

#34 Marlene

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Posted 06 August 2004 - 12:03 PM

I must admit that part of the reason I want one is I'm lazy :biggrin: . Well that and I try to conserve water when camping because quite often we aren't connected to city water and are running off our water tanks.

In the evening, I set up our percolator for morning coffee. Yes, yes I know. You're supposed to do it fresh in the morning. However, in the confined spaces of an RV, when I'm the first one up in the morning (almost always), I try to make as little noise as possible so everyone else can sleep. This way, all I have to do is plug it in as opposed to grinding beans, running water etc. Nice and quiet.

In the evening, we really like coffee and Baileys or Grandmarnier after dinner. If I use the percolator, I have to wash it out before going to bed so I can set it up. So we've been using instant coffee at night (ick ick ick), and I can't stand it. So my answer is a French Press. I like the stainless one because I try to keep glass things out of the RV. And I always pour the morning coffee into a separate carafe and I would do so with the French Press coffee as well.
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#35 Jim Cotter

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Posted 07 August 2004 - 02:55 PM

I think the nissan from Campmor is the best bet for being on the road or in my kitchen where I have broken several Bodum glass presses. :cool:

#36 Marlene

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Posted 20 August 2004 - 11:36 AM

My new French Press has arrived, just in time for our next RV trip. I'm about to start grinding beans for it. Do I grind them the same as I would for Perked coffee or coarser?

:blink:
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#37 Richard Kilgore

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Posted 20 August 2004 - 08:40 PM

Coarser, Marlene, or you'll have extra sludge.

#38 Jason Perlow

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Posted 20 August 2004 - 08:43 PM

Coarser, Marlene, or you'll have extra sludge.

Unless of course, you LIKE the sludge, like I do.
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#39 Richard Kilgore

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Posted 21 August 2004 - 12:06 AM

Of course. :shock:

#40 Mottmott

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Posted 21 August 2004 - 10:19 AM

I use the bodum french press for a single cup of coffee, but when I want to make a larger amount I love using the chemex. The grounds stay up in the paper filter which can be easily tossed. If anything needs reheating, it can easily be done in a waterbath. I think there's some little contraption that you can order to use to keep it warm, but I've never bothered. (Or am I thinking of the Jena teapot contraption which I also don't use?)
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#41 adegiulio

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Posted 25 August 2004 - 08:15 AM

Just bought a Frieling 7-8 cup SS insulated French Press. It looks great and makes terrific coffee. The coffee stays hot for a good hour (the coffee doesnt last that long very often :smile: ).

Anyway, just thought I would mention a coffee product I am actually happy with...
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#42 Marlene

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Posted 26 August 2004 - 04:17 AM

We are on the road this week, and have been using the new French Press every night. I'm very impressed with this. It makes wonderful coffee, which we immediately pour into an insulated carafe. A little French Press coffee, a little Bailey,s some whipped cream, and a campfire. Doesn't get much better than this.

:smile:
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#43 lancastermike

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Posted 01 January 2005 - 06:44 AM

My darling wife got me a Bodum french press and burr grinder for Christmas. This moring is the first time I used it following the instructions from Sweet Maria link in the pinned brewing topics thread.

The beans were Sumatran froma local roaster. I used bottled water instead of tap.
I found the flavor to be much brighter than my usual drip. And the arouma was stronger and filled the room. I think the temperture was the reason as my DeLonghi dripper does not get hot enough anymore.

I doubted I would notice a big difference, but I really did. I have a friend who has a coffee shop. He has always told me a press is the only way he drinks coffee. Now I know why. Very happy, it was a lovely gift.

#44 SteveCleve

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Posted 01 January 2005 - 07:09 AM

I love it as well. I started using one about a year ago. You might want to consider getting the gold filter that Sweet Maria's sells to replace the standard 3 piece contraption that comes with Bodum's presses. I don't know if the gold filter makes the coffee taste any better, but it sure is a lot more convenient.

#45 blork

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Posted 10 January 2005 - 10:26 PM

Apparently those Swiss gold one-piece things are sold out and are no longer being manufactured. Too bad.

I've been using French presses for years and I love the results. My method is pretty straighforward:

- one scoop per cup,
- use hot (not boiling) water,
- let it sit for almost two minutes,
- stir (using the plastic coffee scoop, not a metal spoon -- the glass is delicate),
- let it sit for another (almost) two minutes,
- plunge, and drink right away, or transfer to an insulated decanter.

Mmmmmm. Coffee....
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#46 jgould

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Posted 12 January 2005 - 01:38 PM

Apparently those Swiss gold one-piece things are sold out and are no longer being manufactured. Too bad.

I've been using French presses for years and I love the results. My method is pretty straighforward:

- one scoop per cup,
- use hot (not boiling) water,
- let it sit for almost two minutes,
- stir (using the plastic coffee scoop, not a metal spoon -- the glass is delicate),
- let it sit for another (almost) two minutes,
- plunge, and drink right away, or transfer to an insulated decanter.

Mmmmmm. Coffee....

View Post

what size french press do u use?

#47 Varmint

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 05:48 AM

I'm a french press newbie, too, and there's absolutely no comparison between the coffee made with this thing and a drip pot. The french press brings out a depth of flavor, including chocolate overtones, that I never experienced in a drip pot. I'm using the same blade grinder, same tap water, but the flavor is amazingly different. Also, I seem to get more of a caffeine buzz from the press. God, I love this thing!
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#48 BrentKulman

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 06:04 AM

How many teaspoons does you use per cup?
The reason I ask is that I had breakfast at a restaurant yesterday that recently introduced individual Bodum french presses for customers who wanted premium coffee. You could choose from Kona, Blue Mountain and Yirgacheffe. Initially, I was ecstatic, although the cheapest of the three (Kona) was $2.95 for a two cup press.

That excitement quickly faded to disappointment when I tasted the coffee. Despite letting it sit for four minutes, the coffee was incredibly weak and watery.

It's hard to tell the volume of coffee once it is wet, but my guess is that there were no more than two teaspoons of coffee in the press.

At home, we use about four teaspoons per cup and generally brew French Roast. It's very full bodied but a bit bitter. That's how my wife likes it so that's what we go with, however.

#49 CharityCase

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 12:55 PM

One more press fan here.

Is four minutes the accepted standard? I drink a fair trade coffee, and I find even 4 minutes to be a bit too long...it tastes so bitter and acidic at that point that's no fun at all.

With a simple cuisinart blade grinder, what's a decent grinding time for Bodum? I lost the manual :(

#50 His Nibs

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 05:31 PM

How many teaspoons does you use per cup?

At home, we use about four teaspoons per cup and generally brew French Roast.  It's very full bodied but a bit bitter.  That's how my wife likes it so that's what we go with, however.

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Depends on the size of your cup, I generally use 4 tablespoons of whole beans for 750 ml of water.


One more press fan here.

Is four minutes the accepted standard? I drink a fair trade coffee, and I find even 4 minutes to be a bit too long...it tastes so bitter and acidic at that point that's no fun at all.

With a simple cuisinart blade grinder, what's a decent grinding time for Bodum? I lost the manual :(

View Post


If it's too bitter, then you either :
a) brewed it too long
or
b) power is too fine a grind.

Since you are letting it steep for 4 mins, I'd say you are grinding your coffee too fine. From Good Eats' episode on coffee, I'd say 12 short pulses should do the trick. The consistency of the powder should be somewhat coarse.

#51 lancastermike

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 05:52 PM

How many teaspoons does you use per cup?

At home, we use about four teaspoons per cup and generally brew French Roast.  It's very full bodied but a bit bitter.  That's how my wife likes it so that's what we go with, however.

View Post


Depends on the size of your cup, I generally use 4 tablespoons of whole beans for 750 ml of water.


One more press fan here.

Is four minutes the accepted standard? I drink a fair trade coffee, and I find even 4 minutes to be a bit too long...it tastes so bitter and acidic at that point that's no fun at all.

With a simple cuisinart blade grinder, what's a decent grinding time for Bodum? I lost the manual :(

View Post


If it's too bitter, then you either :
a) brewed it too long
or
b) power is too fine a grind.

Since you are letting it steep for 4 mins, I'd say you are grinding your coffee too fine. From Good Eats' episode on coffee, I'd say 12 short pulses should do the trick. The consistency of the powder should be somewhat coarse.

View Post

I use one of the scoop that came with the Bodum grinder per 4 ounces of water. I have a big 16oz mug so four scoops, i brew for just around 4 minutes total with a good stir after the first minute

Edited by lancastermike, 18 January 2005 - 05:53 PM.


#52 SushiCat

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 05:40 PM

the standard measure for french press coffee is two level tablespoons for each 6 ounces of water.

I highly recommend starting with this, and changing proportions depending on your taste as you adjust to this method of brewing.

For CharityCase and others, we hope you are buying your beans somewhere decent, if so, they will grind a small portion for you at the appropriate fine/coarse level for French Press, you can then put this in a clear small zip lock bag to use as a reference point as you grind at home.

it is a old trick from my days as a barista, I hope you find it useful.

Also ... beware as French press is the first step to wanting a fancy home espresso machine ... you can't say I didn't warn you!

Happy coffee brewing and drinking !

#53 CharityCase

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 08:36 AM

Good tip there SushiCat, thanks. I tried the 12 little whirrs recommended above and it was just about right. I had been holding it down for 5 or 6 seconds and that's clearly too much.

#54 waves2ya

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 09:40 AM

Curious departure in this thread was suggestion that water should not be boiling...

One of the reasons (among others) I French Press is total control of water temp; making sure 205 is achieved.

I bring to a boil, coarse ground (like sushi's suggestion!), wait 5 min's & consume promptly.

And really wish Maria's had that gold filter thingies for sale (can ya make one from the drip version...? Any have the drip version...?)
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#55 bakerboy

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 09:53 AM

I'm new to this forum but i am a big coffee press fan. i always use whole beans and grind them down to a medium grind. i use 1 oz. of coffee to 4 cups h2o, press the coffee into the h2o and wait 5 min. and i got great coffee. My only complaint is that my coffee/spice grinder doesn't grind evenly. It seems to get some of the beans to where i want it but always bashes some to a powder. My wife grabbed the french roast coffee one morning, weighed out 1 oz. and ground it to a powder. After 5 min. in the h2o we had some REALLY strong coffee. I'm looking for a grinder that will give me an even grind, like the kind in the supermarket or in good coffee shops. I wonder if these are prohibitively expensive.
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#56 Country Cook

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 10:01 AM

French press really is awsome coffee. I just used my little one cup this morning for the first time in a long time with freshly coarse ground Ethiopean dark roast and it was so much better than my hamilton-beach drip (same coffee same water). I can see sushicat's comment about wanting an expresso machine!

#57 fiftydollars

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 10:10 AM

I'm looking for a grinder that will give me an even grind, like the kind in the supermarket or in good coffee shops.  I wonder if these are prohibitively expensive.

View Post

I assume you are currently using a blade grinder. What you probably want is a burr grinder. These provide a more uniform grind with little to no dust. They are more expensive, of course, but definitely worth it. Recently I have been seeing more of these and the prices are much lower ($20-$50 at Costco, Target, etc…) than I used to find a couple of years ago ($150+). However, I am not sure how well these lower cost grinders work...

#58 jayt90

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 10:31 AM

How many teaspoons does you use per cup?
The reason I ask is that I had breakfast at a restaurant yesterday that recently introduced individual Bodum french presses for customers who wanted premium coffee.  You could choose from Kona, Blue Mountain and Yirgacheffe.  Initially, I was ecstatic, although the cheapest of the three (Kona) was $2.95 for a two cup press.

That excitement quickly faded to disappointment when I tasted the coffee.  Despite letting it sit for four minutes, the coffee was incredibly weak and watery. 

It's hard to tell the volume of coffee once it is wet, but my guess is that there were no more than two teaspoons of coffee in the press.

At home, we use about four teaspoons per cup and generally brew French Roast.  It's very full bodied but a bit bitter.  That's how my wife likes it so that's what we go with, however.

View Post

This would be good enough reason to send it back, or complain. Who knows what was going on back there? New staff; inconsistent policy; running out of some beans? It would be simple for the restaurant to do do something about your complaint.

#59 His Nibs

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 10:47 AM

I'm looking for a grinder that will give me an even grind, like the kind in the supermarket or in good coffee shops.  I wonder if these are prohibitively expensive.

View Post

I assume you are currently using a blade grinder. What you probably want is a burr grinder. These provide a more uniform grind with little to no dust. They are more expensive, of course, but definitely worth it. Recently I have been seeing more of these and the prices are much lower ($20-$50 at Costco, Target, etc…) than I used to find a couple of years ago ($150+). However, I am not sure how well these lower cost grinders work...

View Post


There is a thread on this forum regarding obtaining a solis maestro burr grinder from costco.com. Also, you can purchase a rebranded solis maestro classic from starbucks (~$99). I use a cheap delonghi burr grinder (costco~ $25) for my press coffee and the starbucks one for my espresso.

Another tip on using the blade grinder is to move it about while grinding. This ensures the blades hit most of the beans instead of pulverising a few beans to dust.

#60 Dani Mc

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Posted 22 January 2005 - 11:16 PM

I love my french press. I don't know if its because I'm more aware of my coffee to water ratio (I also saw the 'Good Eats' coffee epi, and have followed AB's ratio ever since), or if the press does indeed produce better coffee than a drip maker, but its the smoothest home brew I've ever made. I used to be a strictly turkish coffee kind of girl, but now I'm leaning more towards the french press for my every day coffee.