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Adventures in Brioche

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68 replies to this topic

#31 janeer

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 07:41 PM

As my basic brioche, I’ve adopted a recipe from Linda Dannenberg’s Paris Boulangerie-Patisserie. The book includes several brioche recipes, I like the one from Ganachaud. The idea and technique for the marbled loaf comes from Nick Malgieri’s The Modern Baker. They are delicious!

Thank you, Linda. I have Modern Baker, and have just ordered the Dannenberg. Your personal tweaks welcome!

#32 Justin Pinkney

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 02:41 PM

These all look fantastic! The brioche recipe in 'the modern cafe' has been tempting me for a long time. There is also a recipe for laminated brioche, i. e. Brioche dough laminated with butter in case there wasn't already enough fat in there for you, sounds amazing though!

Also there are some crazy Danish recipes in that book which I am trying to muster the courage to try, would be very interested to know if anyone here has made any of them.

#33 Almondmeal

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 02:38 AM

Hi, I am currently doing my apprenticeship for patisserie at a new place and I have got to say that they make one of the brioche that I have ever tasted. At work, the make this scrumptious blueberry with creme patisserie and topped with coconut crumble brioche rectAngles and oh my god, they are so good. I have been keeping myself a fresh baked ones every morning with a comlimentary coffee! It's an absolute delight!

#34 janeer

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 11:38 AM

These all look fantastic! The brioche recipe in 'the modern cafe' has been tempting me for a long time. There is also a recipe for laminated brioche, i. e. Brioche dough laminated with butter in case there wasn't already enough fat in there for you, sounds amazing though!

Also there are some crazy Danish recipes in that book which I am trying to muster the courage to try, would be very interested to know if anyone here has made any of them.

Sherry Yard also has a laminated brioche recipe I've been meaning to try, and danish. I love danish. I am making brioche as we speak from yet another recipe, will post results.

#35 janeer

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 06:23 PM

So I made Helen Fletcher's brioche recipe--it is made in the food processor, and it is a high-fat (like Reinhart's "rich man's brioche) recipe. My individual brioche molds seem to have gone missing in my recent move, so I made brioche a tete in my big brioche pan. Thought I had the topknot well-seated but it slid to one side on rising. True, decadant,melting brioche flavor and texture. Pic toasted and buttered. I cut it a little warm. Have a hard time with the bread-cooling thing.

My Dannenberg arrived today so I look forward to reading that

Sorry, can't seem to upload my pix--too big. will have to figure that out, haven't had problems before.

#36 janeer

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 09:30 PM

Used a conversion program, so here the photos are. Helen Fletcher rich brioche, toasted for breakfast.

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  • brioche reduced.jpg
  • brioch toasted smaller.jpg


#37 LindaK

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 05:34 AM

Here's a variation to consider: polenta brioche. I saw it in a cookbook on Venetian cuisine. It's a standard rich brioche recipe with a small amount of coarse-ground polenta added for flavor and texture. Think of it as the most luxurious corn bread you'll ever make.

The real reason I made it, though, is because the cookbook recommended it for a brioche bread pudding. Once I had that thought in my head, there was nothing to do but make one so I didn't spend all day thinking about it. So half the loaf was sliced for toast and jam. The next day, I cut the remaining brioche into fingers and layered them with berries in a small souffle dish. Soaked everything with eggs, cream, and a bit of vanilla and cinammon for good measure. It puffed up beautifully and the berries bubbled. Because it was so rich, it was plenty for two.

DSCF1262.JPG

Because the polenta cuts through the sweetness of the bread, it would be really good in a savory bread pudding too. I'm thinking about mushrooms...


 


#38 janeer

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 07:01 PM

Here's a variation to consider: polenta brioche. I saw it in a cookbook on Venetian cuisine. It's a standard rich brioche recipe with a small amount of coarse-ground polenta added for flavor and texture. Think of it as the most luxurious corn bread you'll ever make.

The real reason I made it, though, is because the cookbook recommended it for a brioche bread pudding. Once I had that thought in my head, there was nothing to do but make one so I didn't spend all day thinking about it. So half the loaf was sliced for toast and jam. The next day, I cut the remaining brioche into fingers and layered them with berries in a small souffle dish. Soaked everything with eggs, cream, and a bit of vanilla and cinammon for good measure. It puffed up beautifully and the berries bubbled. Because it was so rich, it was plenty for two.

DSCF1262.JPG

Because the polenta cuts through the sweetness of the bread, it would be really good in a savory bread pudding too. I'm thinking about mushrooms...

Being a corn person, this appeals to me. What is the proportion of polenta meal to flour?

#39 LindaK

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 04:31 AM

Being a corn person, this appeals to me. What is the proportion of polenta meal to flour?


The recipe (for 2 loaves) called for 1/3 cup (125 g) coarse-grained polenta w/ up to 5 cups (625 g) flour.

The polenta was soaked before using it--the recipe calls for adding the yeast to warm cream with a bit of sugar, then after it begins to froth, adding the polenta and letting the mixture sit for a while before proceeding with the recipe.


 


#40 janeer

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 08:12 PM


Being a corn person, this appeals to me. What is the proportion of polenta meal to flour?


The recipe (for 2 loaves) called for 1/3 cup (125 g) coarse-grained polenta w/ up to 5 cups (625 g) flour.

The polenta was soaked before using it--the recipe calls for adding the yeast to warm cream with a bit of sugar, then after it begins to froth, adding the polenta and letting the mixture sit for a while before proceeding with the recipe.

Thanks, Interesting.

#41 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 06:48 AM

Under the heading "adventures in laminated brioche" - here's a different take on Pain au Chocolate. Instead of using butter to create poofy croissant type creatures, I used whiskey creme ganache and kept folding until it threatened to break through the layers of dough. For the curious, I'm using a 1-egg, 1/4 lb of butter, 25% quinua brioche dough, which is my go-to brioche these days (I have difficulty eating the higher-egg versions, so basically I'm a purveyor of Brioche de Povre).

Posted Image

They were flatter than I'd have hoped, but the flavour and texture are fabulous.
Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
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#42 Kerry Beal

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 10:04 AM

Under the heading "adventures in laminated brioche" - here's a different take on Pain au Chocolate. Instead of using butter to create poofy croissant type creatures, I used whiskey creme ganache and kept folding until it threatened to break through the layers of dough. For the curious, I'm using a 1-egg, 1/4 lb of butter, 25% quinua brioche dough, which is my go-to brioche these days (I have difficulty eating the higher-egg versions, so basically I'm a purveyor of Brioche de Povre).

Posted Image

They were flatter than I'd have hoped, but the flavour and texture are fabulous.


Oops - I see you have told us more!

#43 LindaK

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 12:08 PM

PanCan, that looks really good. I had no idea brioche could be rolled so thinly. Whisky creme ganache, inspired!

As it happens, I had a similar thought yesterday for a savory brioche as a way to use up a small piece of extra brioche dough as well as some leftover caramelized onions. I layered the dough with the onions and a little grated gruyere cheese, though I only folded it three times. I took a picture when it came out of the oven:

DSCF1270.JPG


This was delicious but oh so rich. Luckily the rest of dinner was just a simple soup.


 


#44 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 01:37 PM

Linda, you really have to butter both your silpat and your rolling pin, and work with cool to cold dough, but it can be done (with patience!)

The ganache was less inspired, though, as it was "oh crud, if I use tempered cooled chocolate in this, it's going to harden and crack and be horrible when I take the dough out of its first chill-down. What do I have that's still supple at cool temps? Oh, hey, look! There's a tub of ganache at the back of the baking fridge!"
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#45 LindaK

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Posted 22 October 2012 - 05:13 PM

Bostock. Created as a way to use stale brioche. Thick sliced are topped with a butter/egg/ground almond mixture, with some sliced almonds for good measure. Bake. The brioche absorbs the topping and it comes out of the oven as a slightly puffy, crunchy-edged marvel of deliciousness.

DSCF1277.JPG

This is the first time I've made bostock at home. Easy. The only problem is that now I have a good idea of just how many calories are in a slice...


 


#46 Jmahl

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 10:40 AM

Lemons and Brioch 008.JPG

Latest incarnation of brioch. Folded in chocolate, raisins, walnuts, sugar and cinnamon.
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#47 LindaK

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 08:13 AM

Beautiful texture in that brioche. It looks like you used grated or chopped chocolate, rather than make a chocolate dough, yes?


 


#48 Jmahl

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 09:22 AM

Yes. Rolled the dough in two layers to try to get even distributation of filling. Thanks for comment.
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#49 LindaK

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 07:52 AM

Braided brioche filled with sweetened creme fraiche and berries. Freeform loaf, nothing fancy, but very nice.


DSCF1289.JPG


 


#50 LindaK

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 04:30 PM

After holiday excesses, it’s been no hardship to stay away from rich food and baked goods. No temptation, until I saw Paula Wolfert’s recipe for le gatis, brioche stuffed with two cheeses. Roquefort cheese is a great weakness of mine, and this called not only for Roquefort but also Cantal, a nutty cheddar-like cheese.

Wolfert calls for covering a small round of brioche with crumbled Roquefort and Cantal, then topping that with small, flattened balls of brioche dough to make a top crust. I’ll need to use a few more next time, as you can see the top wasn’t covered quite enough.

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A wedge with a side salad for lunch, served warm so the cheese was still melting. Very delicious and very, very rich.

DSCF1308.JPG

Leftovers cut into smaller pieces, destined to accompany vegetable soup tomorrow night.

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If you love Roquefort, the pairing of the salty cheese with the buttery, slightly sweet bread will make you swoon.


 


#51 janeer

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 07:32 PM

Good heavens, that looks good. And rich.

#52 LindaK

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 05:51 AM

There actually wasn't that much cheese--less than 4 oz for the recipe. The strong flavor of the Roquefort, though, made it seem like much more.

edited to add: even if you never make this particular recipe, the trick of making "stuffed" brioche here with the layer of flattened brioche balls is nice to remember, you could use it over any topping, savory or sweet.


 


#53 Bojana

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 02:29 AM

I cannot get out of my head the idea of a totally decadent truffle brioche to pair with seared foie gras.

On the freezing note, I assume the dough would freeze well but could anyone please confirm?

#54 jmacnaughtan

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:30 AM

I cannot get out of my head the idea of a totally decadent truffle brioche to pair with seared foie gras.

On the freezing note, I assume the dough would freeze well but could anyone please confirm?


Freezing can be hit or miss- the last time I used frozen dough I split it in half before freezing, there was practically no rise in the frozen batch compared to the fresh.

Professionals generally use improvers if they're going to freeze the dough. It takes the risk out of it.

#55 LindaK

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 05:40 AM

A couple of my recipes note that the dough can be frozen up to a week. When I've tried it, it's worked, thought the rise was not quite as good.

The truffle idea sounds brilliant. I wonder how the flavor holds up during baking.


 


#56 Bojana

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:25 PM

The truffle idea is not mine but agree it is brilliant. Will try in 2 weeks and report back

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#57 Lisa Shock

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 11:29 PM

Has anyone ever lined their pan with med-fine pearl sugar? I am thinking about making a brioche that I want to turn out of a mold and would like some decoration on it. I was wondering if the pearl sugar would survive as white bits, or would caramelize? I am thinking of spraying the pan then tossing some pearl sugar in, and then adding the dough.

#58 janeer

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 09:28 PM

Has anyone ever lined their pan with med-fine pearl sugar? I am thinking about making a brioche that I want to turn out of a mold and would like some decoration on it. I was wondering if the pearl sugar would survive as white bits, or would caramelize? I am thinking of spraying the pan then tossing some pearl sugar in, and then adding the dough.

Haven't done it, but would think it might caramelize.

#59 Lisa Shock

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 10:53 PM

Yeah, that's what I am thinking. I'll probably get around to baking something tomorrow night and see.

#60 Bojana

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 01:54 AM

I wish you could smell my kitchen! Truffle brioche, mmmm... I forgot to brush it with eggwash, but other than the non glossy looks, it was divine!

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  • brioche.JPG






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