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Favorite tools for hand enrobing?


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58 replies to this topic

#31 tammylc

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 03:17 PM

Great demo!!  And such lovely straight cuts - are you holding out and have a guitar at home?

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Agreed on both counts - that was very helpful.

What kind of thin bladed knife are you using? Can you take a picture?

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#32 alanamoana

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 03:35 PM

I think it is what is called a "petty knife" by the Japanese. It is in between a paring knife and a smaller sized chef's knife...sort of my general utility knife. I like it because it is small and has a thin blade.

Here's a picture of it and a ruler for scale. Next to it is the piece of plastic that I cut to one inch wide to use as my cutting guide:
Posted Image

#33 mrose

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 03:51 PM

I am another person jonesing for a guitar. I found a Rool & Cut fondant workmat made by Wilton which has a 1" grid pattern. I put the ganache sheet on that squared to a corner & mark the squares. I learnt the hard way not to cut on the sheet since it is very thin & has a bunch of squares cut out. You also need a pitcher of hot water to clean knife.
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#34 alanamoana

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 03:57 PM

Mark, a lot of those self healing mats have inch markings (office supply stores and fabric/craft stores)...and you can cut on them since that's what they're designed for!

I didn't use hot water, as this ganache was pretty soft and I didn't want it to seal back together after I cut. That can be the down side. But, if you have a sturdy ganache, then that's the way to go. I just wiped the blade with a paper towel after each cut.

#35 alanamoana

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 02:35 PM

Thanks John! I only wish you were here to photograph...you're a great photographer!

I'm going to try and do a small piping demo this weekend. Hopefully my husband can help. It's a bit hard to dip and snap photos at the same time and I imagine it is more difficult while piping :blink: .

#36 sote23

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 02:15 AM

Great demo!!  And such lovely straight cuts - are you holding out and have a guitar at home?

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yes, i think she has had a guitar the whole time lol lol.
great demo.

Luis

#37 Mary F

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 09:47 AM

wonderful demo Alana, perfection as usual! glad I got to see it from you in person.
Also, wanted to point out the spacing between the chocolates in Alana's photos. As Wybauw mentioned numerous times, chocolate is a great insulator. Evenly spacing them apart, as Alana did, allows for air to properly circulate.

#38 alanamoana

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 10:21 AM

thanks for that point mary! if you put them too close together the sides might not stay in temper as it will take them too long to cool down.

thanks luis!

#39 Desiderio

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 11:28 AM

Sorry I am late, but thank you so much Alana for your great help.Your technique is impeccable :smile:
Vanessa

#40 cheripie

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 11:48 AM

I don't know if this will help others, but it's worked for me: I've been using a long flat double handled knife to cut ganache before enrobing. It goes all the way across with one cut down. I've tried other knifes but I am terrible at cutting a straight line, even with a guide. It's not cheap, but until I get get the funds together for a guitar, it helps.

Here's where I got it:
Double Handled Knife
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#41 mrose

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 11:59 AM

I don't know if this will help others, but it's worked for me: I've been using a long flat double handled knife to cut ganache before enrobing.  It goes all the way across with one cut down. I've tried other knifes but I am terrible at cutting a straight line, even with a guide.  It's not cheap, but until I get get the funds together for a guitar, it helps.

Here's where I got it:
Double Handled Knife

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You can also look for them on the net under cheese knives, might find them a bit cheaper. Another alternative is to use a pizza cutter that is approx 16" long rocker (not the wheel on a handle).
Mark
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#42 lapin d'or

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 01:10 PM

I don't know if this will help others, but it's worked for me: I've been using a long flat double handled knife to cut ganache before enrobing.  It goes all the way across with one cut down. I've tried other knifes but I am terrible at cutting a straight line, even with a guide.  It's not cheap, but until I get get the funds together for a guitar, it helps.



I have been using one of those for a few weeks now and it has helped a lot. I bought mine from a UK catering firm where it was described as a cheese knife. I am only working with small batches but you could cut quite a big slab with mine if you needed to.

Jill

#43 Trishiad

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 08:34 AM

I've been too busy and tired for typing lately but meant to say this:

Alana, your dipping technique is superb! I am so impressed by your attention to detail.

#44 patsikes

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 01:12 PM

I tend to use a large board scraper for cutting caramels and ganaches also. Less worry about sharp blades.
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#45 sote23

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 09:17 PM

I tend to use a large board scraper for cutting caramels and ganaches also.  Less worry about sharp blades.

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can you elaborate on the use of the scraper.

Luis

#46 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 04:36 AM

I don't know if this will help others, but it's worked for me: I've been using a long flat double handled knife to cut ganache before enrobing.  It goes all the way across with one cut down. I've tried other knifes but I am terrible at cutting a straight line, even with a guide.  It's not cheap, but until I get get the funds together for a guitar, it helps.

Here's where I got it:
Double Handled Knife

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Saw a large 15 inch version of this double handled knife yesterday at the trade show, white handles, made by Dexter, it was about $55 from Hilliard chocolate systems.

#47 patsikes

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 06:53 AM

I tend to use a large board scraper for cutting caramels and ganaches also.  Less worry about sharp blades.

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can you elaborate on the use of the scraper.

Luis

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I use something like this.

Instead of using a knife, I just use the scraper by pressing is down through the product, moving over and repeating. I can normally get a pretty straight line.

The one thing that it tends to do, which I kind of like when doing caramels, is that it causes the top edge of the product to somewhat round out. So instead of the top edges being square, they are rounded.

You can see the result (kind of) http://www.psiloveyo...ieceCaramel.jpg

Hope that helps.

Edited by patsikes, 17 April 2007 - 06:58 AM.

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#48 mkayahara

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Posted 07 December 2007 - 12:41 PM

I'm bumping this thread because it seems most applicable to my question: I'm hoping to pick up some dipping tools for my partner for Christmas, because he makes chocolate-dipped peanut butter balls every year and every year complains about dipping them. But I'm not sure what kind of tools to get! It looks like my options are a three-piece all-metal set (two-tine fork, three-tine fork and a "swirl," sort of a spiraled coil) or a two-piece wood-handled set (two-tine fork and loop). Does anyone have any thoughts in particular on the relative merits of a "swirl" vs. a loop, and the wood vs. metal handles?

Thanks in advance!
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#49 alanamoana

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Posted 07 December 2007 - 04:06 PM

the swirl can be used for adding a decorative top to the truffle (same with the loop and other shapes).

you really only need a two or three tined fork and maybe one of the special shapes. i don't think it matters if the handle is metal or wood or plastic for that matter. personal preference i guess. the plastic handles are easier (last longer) to keep clean.

#50 Kerry Beal

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Posted 28 November 2008 - 05:17 PM

New toy today. I took my favorite dipping fork into work so that one of the girls from the xray department could show it to her husband. He makes these amazing metal sculptures and I had the idea that he could copy the metal part of my fork with stainless wire, and I'd figure out the handle problem after he did that. Well he did me one better and actually made the whole fork out of stainless.

The welds are all stainless so it's food grade and because it has no wooden handle it can go in the dishwasher.


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He's doing a bit of pricing and will figure out how much it will cost to make me a few.

#51 Desiderio

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Posted 28 November 2008 - 08:12 PM

what a great idea! Nice job, he might start a side business :raz:
Vanessa

#52 Kerry Beal

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Posted 28 November 2008 - 08:14 PM

what a great idea! Nice job, he might start a side business  :raz:

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I suspect given his artistic talents that making these would bore him - but hopefully I'll get a few before he gets bored. He suggested the payment for this first one be chocolate covered almonds. So I'll have to get to work on those tomorrow.

#53 Desiderio

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Posted 28 November 2008 - 08:34 PM

Well he could always make different designs like different handles etc, they would be so pretty. Chocolate covered almond isnt a bad price :biggrin:
Vanessa

#54 Lior

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Posted 29 November 2008 - 01:30 AM

Can't he make them with the bend in them already? I always bend mine!

#55 Kerry Beal

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Posted 29 November 2008 - 06:44 AM

Can't he make them with the bend in them already? I always bend mine!

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This one is bent - at the precise angle I had bent the one I took to show him. Apparently you can bend them more - but it's pretty stiff!

#56 mostlylana

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Posted 29 November 2008 - 11:43 AM

I love that it can go in the dishwasher. I definitely want one - but with more of a bend please... I like the bend of fork on the cover of the Andrew Shotts book - 'Making Artisan Chocolates'. Speaking of which - your fork looks just like his Kerry. Where did you get it please!? I use the Wilton fork I get from Michael's but it's not too easy to bend. The Shotts fork (your fork Kerry) looks like it would be easier to bend. My fork has a flattened end - I notice that the 2 you pictured don't. Do you get marks on your bottoms where the chocolate slides off? Here's a photo of the flattened tips I am talking about
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#57 Kerry Beal

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Posted 29 November 2008 - 01:03 PM

I got this fork from JB Prince in NYC. It was part of a set. It's the only one I use out of the set - although the little basket like one is cute to look at. They are available online from some other sites.

They are made by (or for) Paderno in Italy. I contacted the american site and they contacted Italy to see if I could have a bunch of the 3 prong fork made up, but unfortunately - only sets.

I get fork marks when my technique sucks, but otherwise they work very well. The ends of the stainless wire are actually bevelled.

Edited by Kerry Beal, 29 November 2008 - 01:05 PM.


#58 mostlylana

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 12:22 AM

Ahhhh... didn't see the bevel. Thanks for the info.

#59 Milangal

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 04:50 PM

I accidentally found my telescoping marshmallow roasting fork from the dollar spot at Target works amazing!! I bent the tongs apart a bit and it's spectacular! I may have to bend the handle a bit but no biggie since it was only $1. It's the tongs are strong yet small for easy dipping.