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Japanese spaghetti


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#61 Hiroyuki

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 11:49 PM

This is very interesting for me as a northern european, never heard about such things as japanese spaghetti.

How come spaghetti has been so incorporated in Japanese food since japan is a country with an allready perfectly well-functioning delicious noodle culture. And why has the japanese made there own sauces instead of just snitching the italian dishes. Here in Sweden, there's mostly only italian or italian-inspired pasta dishes though pasta is a eaten daily by almost every swede. Except a dish with baked macaroni , eggs, milk, ham and chopped leeks which is really swedish.

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That's a distinctive characteristic of the Japanese - We like to absorb and assimilate foreign cultures, first from China and Korea, later from Europe and the United States, and now from all over the world.

As for sauces, the Japanese always go for bland diets rather than greasy ones.

#62 torakris

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Posted 25 May 2005 - 11:07 PM

I just picked up the recent copy (June 2005) of Syokusai Roman (食彩浪漫) a combination magazine/cooking show from NHK and it is mostly about pasta.

They have some really good looking Japanese style pasta dishes.

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#63 smallworld

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Posted 23 June 2005 - 07:15 PM

My husband made Gyuniku to Maitake no Wafuu Pasta (Beef and Maitake Japanese-style Pasta) last night:

Posted Image

Very simple recipe with spaghetti mixed with red wine and olive oil before being topped with beef and maitake cooked with soy sauce, mirin, sake and mentsuyu. Finished off with mitsuba.
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#64 torakris

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Posted 24 June 2005 - 12:14 AM

that picture is gorgeous!

I like the idea of beef and maitake together.

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#65 SheenaGreena

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 01:22 PM

I like to go to the japanese grocery store, because they have fun items I like to try out and this caught my eye

its basically a sauce packet of "pasta sauce uni cream" and its from the company, Nippn. unfortunately there are no instructions on how to cook it (at least not in english) and I was wondering if any of you knew?

Im assuming you just dump it on some cooked pasta.

have any of you tried this product? does it taste good?

I also bought some spicy cod roe pasta, but I think i'll have this uni cream one tonight for dinner

also, any garnish suggestions or side dish suggestions? thanks



also, what does: namafumi uni kurimu sauce mean? I only know what uni means

Edited by SheenaGreena, 28 February 2007 - 01:25 PM.

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#66 SheenaGreena

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 02:01 PM

I just found the uni cream packet that I bought through trial and error on the nippn homepage if you want to see what it looks like.

uni cream pasta sauce
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#67 torakris

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 02:53 PM

I rarely eat Japanese prepared pasta sauces but have been served them on occasion, they really run the gamut from inedibly awful to not half bad...

I have never tried this product you are referring to though.

The package says they use real uni in the sauce but I just wonder how much. :biggrin:

namafumi uni kurimu sauce

namafumi 
nama means raw/fresh
fumi refers to a taste or a flavor

kurimu is cream


So essentially it is a cream sauce with the flavor of fresh uni
but I guess you will need to be the judge of that. :biggrin:

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#68 SheenaGreena

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 03:20 PM

I should've figured that "kurimu" means cream.


yeah, I'm scared to eat this. It was kind of expensive too: $4.19 for a packet (yes I think that's expensive, I'm cheap). At least sea urchin is listed 4th on the ingredient list after soy bean oil, whole milk, and whole egg.

do you have any suggestions for garnishes or side dishes, torakris? I wonder if it would taste good with parmasean cheese or basil
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#69 torakris

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 03:33 PM

I should've figured that "kurimu" means cream. 


yeah, I'm scared to eat this.  It was kind of expensive too: $4.19 for a packet (yes I think that's expensive, I'm cheap).  At least sea urchin is listed 4th on the ingredient list after soy bean oil, whole milk, and whole egg.

do you have any suggestions for garnishes or side dishes, torakris?  I wonder if it would taste good with parmasean cheese or basil

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Maybe I am becoming too Japanese but I think it would be best with a nice sprinkling of shredded nori.
A quick search on of Japanese pages pulls up a couple blogs in which almost everyone comments that it is quite good. One person described it as salty but also said it would go well with sake. :biggrin:
It is quite a bit cheaper here, in the 200 to 250 yen range ($1.70 to $2)

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#70 SheenaGreena

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 03:44 PM

I should've figured that "kurimu" means cream. 


yeah, I'm scared to eat this.  It was kind of expensive too: $4.19 for a packet (yes I think that's expensive, I'm cheap).  At least sea urchin is listed 4th on the ingredient list after soy bean oil, whole milk, and whole egg.

do you have any suggestions for garnishes or side dishes, torakris?  I wonder if it would taste good with parmasean cheese or basil

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Maybe I am becoming too Japanese but I think it would be best with a nice sprinkling of shredded nori.
A quick search on of Japanese pages pulls up a couple blogs in which almost everyone comments that it is quite good. One person described it as salty but also said it would go well with sake. :biggrin:
It is quite a bit cheaper here, in the 200 to 250 yen range ($1.70 to $2)

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I knew I wasn't crazy when I said that I thought $4.15 for a packet was rediculous...yet I paid for it, didn't I?

oh yeah, it comes with shredded nori. I forgot to add that and I think I'm going to add some diced tomato to the product. I figured that it wouldn't be that bad, because I understand all of the ingredients on the package and there aren't that many. I'll let you know how it tastes...too bad I don't have a digi cam that works

thanks so much for the help and suggestions :raz:

p.s. sake would be good with this pasta sauce (or added directly to the sauce) but I sick so I think I'll just drink some roasted barley tea. I think japanese drink that, don't they? in korea its called "hori cha" and its delicious yum yum
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#71 Hiroyuki

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 03:50 PM

I think I'll just drink some roasted barley tea.  I think japanese drink that, don't they? in korea its called "hori cha" and its delicious yum yum

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Yes, we do. We call it mugicha.

Shredded nori is almost a "must" in a Japanese-style spaghetti. :biggrin: I can also sprinkle some katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes).

#72 SheenaGreena

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 04:19 PM

sorry guys, but I opted against the nori. Instead I added chopped tomatos and shredded basil


boy does it taste yummy! oh and it reeks of sea urchin (which is a good thing). I have to eat in the kitchen so I don't make my boyfriend sick - booooooooooo. But I like it, I think it tastes very yummy and tastes alot like sea urchin
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#73 JasonTrue

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 04:29 PM

I noticed these (or similar) expensive prepared pasta sauces at Uwajimaya recently. I was wondering who might buy them... I couldn't imagine people as nostalgiac for packaged pseudo-Italian Japanese pasta sauces as I could for curry roux or the like.

Many Japanese companies don't offer very good pricing for export, sometimes treating even large companies like JFC/Nishimoto as nothing more than ordinary retailers, even for large volumes. Since the products also need to be distributed and sometimes brokered, it's not too surprising to see products costing about 3 times the Japanese retail price... 2 times the original price is sometimes a bare minimum unless the manufacturer offers better discounts.

Granted, most of the upscale Italian-focused specialty shops have $4 and $5 ready-to-heat pasta sauces, but they're usually fresh and often not bad.

I'm a bit at a loss, though... do any Japanese consider such prepared pasta sauces important for making pasta? Somehow, prepared curry roux managed to become indispensible, even though it's not hard to make a brown roux and not hard to add spices to it, but I think it's because of perceived value: the ingredients are not sold separately and cheaply (namely, the spices) in that case.

However, a little cream and a little uni and a little salt, in the quantities used in such packages, shouldn't be that much of an expense. A small package of cream, more than twice what you'd need, is about 300 yen, and I'm sure you could occasionally find 20 grams of uni on special at a supermarket for 300 yen.

A roux will deteriorate less when packaged than retort packed uni. I find it hard to imagine that the flavor would be special without resorting to various flavoring additives.
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#74 torakris

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 04:40 PM

I think because the fact that most of these sauce packets are sold in one and two person serving, they are aiming at a younger or even a much older market of either singles or couples. It is pretty much a convenient food for those who don't feel like cooking. If you are only cooking for one, it is much cheaper (and easier clean up as well)to pick up this packaged uni sauce than to go the store for fresh uni and cream and half most of it left over.

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#75 SheenaGreena

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 06:50 PM

I think because the fact that most of these sauce packets are sold in one and two person serving, they are aiming at a younger or even a much older market of either singles or couples. It is pretty much a convenient food for those who don't feel like cooking. If you are only cooking for one, it is much cheaper (and easier clean up as well)to pick up this packaged uni sauce than to go the store for fresh uni and cream and half most of it left over.

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yep you are exactly right and I'm one of those people who cooks for one.


I noticed these (or similar) expensive prepared pasta sauces at Uwajimaya recently. I was wondering who might buy them... I couldn't imagine people as nostalgiac for packaged pseudo-Italian Japanese pasta sauces as I could for curry roux or the like.

Many Japanese companies don't offer very good pricing for export, sometimes treating even large companies like JFC/Nishimoto as nothing more than ordinary retailers, even for large volumes. Since the products also need to be distributed and sometimes brokered, it's not too surprising to see products costing about 3 times the Japanese retail price... 2 times the original price is sometimes a bare minimum unless the manufacturer offers better discounts.

Granted, most of the upscale Italian-focused specialty shops have $4 and $5 ready-to-heat pasta sauces, but they're usually fresh and often not bad.

I'm a bit at a loss, though... do any Japanese consider such prepared pasta sauces important for making pasta? Somehow, prepared curry roux managed to become indispensible, even though it's not hard to make a brown roux and not hard to add spices to it, but I think it's because of perceived value: the ingredients are not sold separately and cheaply (namely, the spices) in that case.

However, a little cream and a little uni and a little salt, in the quantities used in such packages, shouldn't be that much of an expense. A small package of cream, more than twice what you'd need, is about 300 yen, and I'm sure you could occasionally find 20 grams of uni on special at a supermarket for 300 yen.

A roux will deteriorate less when packaged than retort packed uni. I find it hard to imagine that the flavor would be special without resorting to various flavoring additives.


I don't know where I'm going to get uni (I bet its in the refridgerated section at the grocery store). Believe it or not the japanese grocery store I go to is incredibly small and really lacking in alot of ingredients. I also don't know how to prepare it at all so I will leave it up to the fine people at nippn. I assume that you just eat it as is, but still the japanese pasta sauce is cheaper, more efficient, and MOST importantly lasts a long time.

If I bought uni, I'd have to use it like within a day or so. I've had this sauce packet for over a week now and its nice that I can eat pasta whenever I want to. I guess that's the most important thing to me.

you should try the pasta sauce, its really not that bad. Although after eating pasta + the sauce, I feel like I just ate a stick of butter...it was soooo rich
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#76 Hiroyuki

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 07:54 PM

I occasionally buy similar products, meat sauces, because my children like them. They are usually sold for 100 yen per pack, and we (a family of two adults and two children) usually use two packs per meal, so I think they are relatively cheap.

#77 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 08:42 PM

I adore the Cook-Do sauces and the Cod Roe Spaghetti.
The Spaghetti Naporitan was good too, but I was expecting more ketchup flavor
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#78 Rebecca263

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 08:50 PM

I always wanted to try uni in pasta. I have only eaten uni sushi or sashimi style, and I adore it. Someday I am going to buy a tray of uni and figure things out, pastawise.
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#79 shinju

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 10:36 AM

[quote name='SheenaGreena' date='Feb 28 2007, 06:50 PM']
[quote

I don't know where I'm going to get uni (I bet its in the refridgerated section at the grocery store).  Believe it or not the japanese grocery store I go to is incredibly small and really lacking in alot of ingredients.  I also don't know how to prepare it at all so I will leave it up to the fine people at nippn.  I assume that you just eat it as is, but still the japanese pasta sauce is cheaper, more efficient, and MOST importantly lasts a long time.

[/quote]

In the stateside, you can order uni directly from this source. I've ordered their items, and all excellent.

http://www.catalinaop.com/

#80 Hiroyuki

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 04:42 AM

Does anyone have a recipe, in English, for the Japanese style napolitan spaghetti? My father-in-law has told us a couple of time about the spaghetti his grandmother (from Japan) made that sounds very close to the Japanese take on napolitan spaghetti. I was thinking that it would be fun to make him some.

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I don't have a recipe for that. Typical ingredients include ham, onions, and green peppers. (You can add corn if your like. :biggrin: ) I make mine with canned tuna (I'm a fan of both fresh and canned tuna), onions, and mixed vegetables (corn, green beans, and carrot cubes).
Fry all ingredients in oil until done.
Boil spaghetti until soft (not al dente! :biggrin: ).
Add the spaghetti and mix well.
Then, finally, add as much ketchup as you want. (I tend to add a lot of it.)

This results in a dish like this:
http://www.eatsmart....e/9002010000006
Enjoy!

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I made Napolitan last Sunday. I just had to because the popular TV drama, Kuitan 2, ended the previous day. :sad: :sad: :sad:
Ending theme song of Kuitan: Itoshi no Napolitan
You'll love it!

Napolitan (4 servings)

400 g spaghetti
1/2 onion
3 green peppers ("peeman" in Japanese)
1/3 carrot
1 pack vienna sausage
1 tube (500 g) ketchup (the more the better :biggrin: )

When making Napolitan and any other Japanese spaghetti dish, you can forget al dente.

#81 shinju

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 05:25 PM

Does anyone have a recipe, in English, for the Japanese style napolitan spaghetti? My father-in-law has told us a couple of time about the spaghetti his grandmother (from Japan) made that sounds very close to the Japanese take on napolitan spaghetti. I was thinking that it would be fun to make him some.

View Post

I don't have a recipe for that. Typical ingredients include ham, onions, and green peppers. (You can add corn if your like. :biggrin: ) I make mine with canned tuna (I'm a fan of both fresh and canned tuna), onions, and mixed vegetables (corn, green beans, and carrot cubes).
Fry all ingredients in oil until done.
Boil spaghetti until soft (not al dente! :biggrin: ).
Add the spaghetti and mix well.
Then, finally, add as much ketchup as you want. (I tend to add a lot of it.)

This results in a dish like this:
http://www.eatsmart....e/9002010000006
Enjoy!

View Post

I made Napolitan last Sunday. I just had to because the popular TV drama, Kuitan 2, ended the previous day. :sad: :sad: :sad:
Ending theme song of Kuitan: Itoshi no Napolitan
You'll love it!

Napolitan (4 servings)

400 g spaghetti
1/2 onion
3 green peppers ("peeman" in Japanese)
1/3 carrot
1 pack vienna sausage
1 tube (500 g) ketchup (the more the better :biggrin: )

When making Napolitan and any other Japanese spaghetti dish, you can forget al dente.

View Post


I like Kuitan too - very cute. I think the young boy is a sweetheart. I'm almost finished watching Bambino and this series have inspired me to cook even more.

This weekend I took ume pasta to a potluck lunch and people liked it but could not figure out the predominant taste of my pasta. :laugh:

I sauteed minced prosciutto, added the umebishio that I made a week ago, minced and slivered green shiso from my garden, and butter. My husband does not like umeboshi, but he really likes this pasta now. I cooked the pasta less than al dente so that it will survive without getting too soft after 2-3 hours.

#82 shinju

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 05:36 PM

BTW, I love the song too. It says even after learning adult tastes like carbonara, arabiatta, etc, the heart still earns napolitan. My mother was the same too. She liked napolitan the Japanese way with ketchup. For some reason when I'm in Japan, it tastes fine to me too :raz:

#83 greenspot

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 04:10 AM

The photos of everyone's mentaiko spaghetti look so delicious. I never tried using mushrooms or sake before and usually only add butter and shiso with a bit of dashi stock.

I tried out an interesting recipe for mentaiko carbonara last night. It's from the LEE Creative Kitchen series.

Posted Image

Spaghetti mixed with one egg, one egg yolk, 1/4 cup cream, couple of teaspoons of grated parmesan, and karashi mentaiko. I also added some fresh uni, shiso leaves and nori to the pasta for extra flavour.

Edited by greenspot, 25 August 2007 - 04:16 AM.


#84 shinju

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 04:18 PM

The photos of everyone's mentaiko spaghetti look so delicious. I never tried using mushrooms or sake before and usually only add butter and shiso with a bit of dashi stock.

I tried out an interesting recipe for mentaiko carbonara last night. It's from the LEE Creative Kitchen series.

Posted Image

Spaghetti mixed with one egg, one egg yolk, 1/4 cup cream, couple of teaspoons of grated parmesan, and karashi mentaiko. I also added some fresh uni, shiso leaves and nori to the pasta for extra flavour.

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That looks so good! I love all things noodle. Did mentaiko more or less cover the taste of uni? Or can you actually taste uni too?

#85 torakris

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 05:09 PM

For lunch a couple days ago I picked a "soup spaghetti", I have had these quite a few times and enjoy them. At one restaurant close to by house this is all they serve. This falls in between a sauced pasta and an actual soup and I am not sure if this is a Japanese creation or they actually serve this in other parts of the world. below is the convenience store version.

Japanese flavor soup spaghetti with umeboshi (pickled plum), chicken, mizuna and wakame seaweed. The soup was a strong garlic flavored chicken broth.

Posted Image

After heating it in the microwave

Posted Image

It is hard to see the soup but there is about 1/2 cup in there.

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#86 torakris

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 05:22 PM

here are some more recipes/pictures of soup spaghetti:

Mushroom soup spaghetti

mushroom, squid, corn and milk :sad:

A colorful version with seafood and vegetables

here is a version that is served cold

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#87 Hiroyuki

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 06:37 PM

Does anyone have a recipe, in English, for the Japanese style napolitan spaghetti? My father-in-law has told us a couple of time about the spaghetti his grandmother (from Japan) made that sounds very close to the Japanese take on napolitan spaghetti. I was thinking that it would be fun to make him some.

View Post

I don't have a recipe for that. Typical ingredients include ham, onions, and green peppers. (You can add corn if your like. :biggrin: ) I make mine with canned tuna (I'm a fan of both fresh and canned tuna), onions, and mixed vegetables (corn, green beans, and carrot cubes).
Fry all ingredients in oil until done.
Boil spaghetti until soft (not al dente! :biggrin: ).
Add the spaghetti and mix well.
Then, finally, add as much ketchup as you want. (I tend to add a lot of it.)

This results in a dish like this:
http://www.eatsmart....e/9002010000006
Enjoy!

View Post

I made Napolitan last Sunday. I just had to because the popular TV drama, Kuitan 2, ended the previous day. :sad: :sad: :sad:
Ending theme song of Kuitan: Itoshi no Napolitan
You'll love it!

Napolitan (4 servings)

400 g spaghetti
1/2 onion
3 green peppers ("peeman" in Japanese)
1/3 carrot
1 pack vienna sausage
1 tube (500 g) ketchup (the more the better :biggrin: )

When making Napolitan and any other Japanese spaghetti dish, you can forget al dente.

View Post

Here is a better version of the song, Itoshi no Napolitan.
Tonight's supper will be napolitan spaghetti!

#88 Lucil

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 04:20 AM

does the taste match with bacon and mentaiko??

#89 prasantrin

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 06:30 AM

does the taste match with bacon and mentaiko??

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I'm not sure what you mean. Could you clarify?

#90 Hiroyuki

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Posted 07 April 2008 - 05:36 AM

Now I have the courage to post a photo of my Napolitan!
Posted Image
I used about 2/3 of a 500-g ketchup tube.
Other ingrediats:
4 green peppers
1/2 carrot
1/2 onion
1 pack Vienna sausage
1 can button mushrooms

I added about 1 tbsp soy sauce and 1 tbps mirin for kakushi aji (secret ingredients) for the very first time.